MEDICAL ILLUSTRATIONS

Our library of 3d medical illustrations of scientific molecular processes, neurotransmitters, viruses, DNA strands, signalling proteins, antibodies, cells, and mitochondria.

Many of these illustrations may be licensed as stock. Please visit our licensing page to find out more…

Caffeine - Art of the Cell

These yellow structures are adenosine A2A receptors in the shell of the nucleus accumbens of the brain. As we become tired, our bodies produce adenosine (the green small molecule above), which binds to these receptors and they, in turn, send signals to inhibit arousal. In other words, we get sleepy. Enter caffeine! (the orange small molecule above). Caffeine binds to the A2A receptors in place of adenosine and blocks the process, so we wake up.

molecular medical science video - art of the cell

My friend Justin Paglino is an Associate Research Scientist in Neurosurgery at Yale. I was talking to him after band practice the other day (he’s also a ridiculously talented singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist), and it turns out he’s an expert on the parvovirus. So, to try and get my head around what he does, I looked up his little friend, and made a render of it. Or at least its capsid. Viruses are just so darn cool, because they really look like little geometric space capsules, which, in fact, they kind of are. Only instead of astronauts or monkeys, they carry the virus’s DNA into the host cell’s nucleus where they pull off a bit of bio-espionage and convert the replication machinery inside to their own nefarious purposes. How cool is that? I mean unless you’re the host, in which case, it’s a little rude.

medical science video - art of the cell

Pariacoto Virus (PaV) is a nodavirus with a dodecahedral cage of RNA inside an icosahedral capsid. PaV infects insects. This one came from a Peruvian armyworm. Really. A viral structure like this just compels me to model and render it.

tRNA-molecular animation-art of the cell

A Transfer RNA is an adaptor molecule composed of RNA, typically 73 to 94 nucleotides in length, that serves as the physical link between the nucleotide sequence of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and the amino acid sequence of proteins.

DNA molecular medical science video - art of the cell

These DNA structures come from pdb 1AOI. In this pdb the DNA is coiled around a histone, as it would be when it is all packed into the nucleosome, but I’ve omitted the histone in this render.

apoptosome molecular medical science video - art of the cell

This star-shaped protein complex is called an apoptosome, and it is constructed in cells to bring about cell death. It’s actually part of a cell’s self-destruct system. When a cell becomes stressed or old, and ceases to function properly, a series of signals bring about apoptosis, or programmed cell death. This is a good thing, and part of the natural life cycle of a cell. Unfortunately, this process can be blocked in cancer cells, preventing your immune system from killing them off.

VEGF – A signalling protein that stimulates the growth of new blood vessels when we grow or heal.

VEGF – A signalling protein that stimulates the growth of new blood vessels when we grow or heal.

Hemoglobin art of the cell medical scientific animation

Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout our bodies. This model is based on pdb 1GZX.

Voronoi-Spheres medical video animation 3D

In mathematics, a Voronoi diagram is a way of dividing space into a number of regions. A set of points (called seeds, sites, or generators) is specified beforehand and for each seed there will be a corresponding region consisting of all points closer to that seed than to any other. The regions are called Voronoi cells. It is named after Georgy Voronoy, and is also called a Voronoi tessellation, a Voronoi decomposition, a Voronoi partition, or a Dirichlet tessellation (after Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet). Voronoi diagrams can be found in a large number of fields in science and technology, even in art, and they have found numerous practical and theoretical applications.

Antibodies-IgG molecular medical cell animation art of the cell

Antibodies are the agents of our immune system. Each is sent to engage a specific target, to neutralize it or tag it for destruction. I’ve been doing some experimental renders with these, trying out different looks with the same geometry and composition. At the top of the page, is my favorite of the moment. It kind of reminds me of the fabulous movie posters created by Drew Struzan for Star Wars. (Sunday is Star Wars Day: May the Fourth Be With You! Get it?.. HA!…) Maybe these are the kind of antibodies that bind to midichlorians and eliminate them from the storyline.

DNA medical science video - art cell

DNA Day is a holiday celebrated on April 25. It commemorates the day in 1953 when James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins, Rosalind Franklin and colleagues published papers in the journal Nature on the structure of DNA. Furthermore, on that day in 2003 it was declared that the Human Genome Project was very close to complete. “The remaining tiny gaps are considered too costly to fill.” They probably just filled it in with frog DNA. What could possibly go wrong? Anyway, here’s a render of some DNA that I made just for the occasion. The structures come from pdb 1AOI. In this pdb the DNA is coiled around a histone, as it would be when it is all packed into the nucleosome, but I’ve omitted the histone in this render. It’s not Histone Day after all.

DNA medical science video - art cell

My friend Justin Paglino is an Associate Research Scientist in Neurosurgery at Yale. I was talking to him after band practice the other day (he’s also a ridiculously talented singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist), and it turns out he’s an expert on the parvovirus. So, to try and get my head around what he does, I looked up his little friend, and made a render of it. Or at least its capsid. Viruses are just so darn cool, because they really look like little geometric space capsules, which, in fact, they kind of are. Only instead of astronauts or monkeys, they carry the virus’s DNA into the host cell’s nucleus where they pull off a bit of bio-espionage and convert the replication machinery inside to their own nefarious purposes. How cool is that? I mean unless you’re the host, in which case, it’s a little rude.

Golgi Apparatus by John Liebler

Golgi Apparatus. Copyright © 2006 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

medical and scientific animation by john liebler

ATP Synthase Complex. Copyright © 2010 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

Mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

Mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

Kinesin-Motor-Protein. Copyright © 2006 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

Kinesin-Motor-Protein. Copyright © 2006 The President and Fellows of Harvard College

Many of these illustrations may be licensed as stock. Please visit our licensing page to find out more…